Your Questions About Anonymous

Susan asks…

What should I do? An anonymous letter was sent to my organization maliciously destroying my integrity?

Recently, my organization head received an anonymous letter saying I did extortion and accepted bribe money for the past two years? The writer is unknown, no address, and it mentions no specific victim of extortion. It contains no lead to a fact of the complain. Honestly, I did not do any such unethical acts!. My supervisor and boss said they will review the over a thousand cases of my work for the past two years, and I am not afraid. What will I do? Who could have done this to me?

barry0912 answers:

You may never know who sent the letter. While its normal to wonder, it can also drive you crazy.

The most important thing in this situation is to remain calm, keep your cool, smile, cooperate and go about your work. Do not allow the inquiry to interfere with your continuing to do a good job.

Second, your organization should contain any possible damage to your reputation. If they feel the need to look into the letter, then fine. Not knowing all the facts, its hard to say if they are acting correctly in even responding this way. They should, however, act in a manner that respects your reputation. The inquiry should be limited to what’s necessary to produce results, and the people involved should be limited only to those that can offer necessary and relevant information and / or have an absolute need to know in order to complete the inquiry. That’s normally legal, HR, your supervisor(s) and other employees that have direct and personal knowledge of important facts. They should do what’s necessary to finish the inquiry as soon as reasonably possible so everyone can put the incident behind the organization.

The specific rules on these matters differ by country and state. Also, the allegations can be criminal, which is fairly serious. I would consider consulting with an employment lawyer in your area. I would avoid involving counsel in the discussions with your employer, and I might even hesitate to make public the fact you are consulting with counsel. That tends to put the discussion on an adversarial footing, some people will react negatively (assume you have something to hide), and it may appear as if your concerned and not cooperating. Having said that, getting some advice in the background is always a good thing … And you can work with your counsel on when, or if, its ever reasonable to involve him / her in the matter.

Good Luck.

Chris asks…

How do I become truly anonymous on the internet?

I already use tor what else can I do because I heard of the government getting passed tor’s security. Is there a computer I can by that is without IP or something. I currently have a mac book are there settings I should turn off or on. How do I become truly anonymous on the internet?

barry0912 answers:

If you don’t have an IP address then it is physically impossible for you to be on the internet. End of story.

The best option would be to use Tor AND pay for a professional VPN that DOES NOT keep any IP records period (some do even though they say they protect identity). Additionally use a browser which randomizes the user agent per every webpage, does not keep cookies, and does not support java.

True anonymity is impossible without getting into a main internet line without the use of an ISP.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Your Questions About Internet Marketing News

Joseph asks…

How private/secure is the internet?

Just wondering, are websites allowed to keep tab on the sites you go, know your name from cookies or something etc. I’M NOT TALKING ABOUT GIVING OUT FREE INFO ON CONTESTS or whatever. Just like… right now, being on any website, what information is being taking, etc.

barry0912 answers:

Kath, like it or not the Internet is the Wild West of data…anything goes.
For starters, how’s this for ‘right now’:
Yahoo! & Google breach of trust to it’s patrons reached a new low.
Both services submissively bowed to advertising conglomerates, by adopting ‘phorm’ inspired “targeted advertising”; a ‘data siphon’ method that directs your clickstream to 3rd party advertisers, and builds a portfolio on your surf habits.
This may make your browser display pop-ups which you have no control over, and may in fact do many other un-requested actions with your entire system.

Google itself has spyware.
From their Privacy Center page
(http://www.google.com/privacy_ads.html)
“No personally identifiable information – We don’t collect or serve ads based on personal information without your permission.”
Notice the last 3 words…yet it is specifically an “Opt Out” condition!

And Gmail, once perceived to be ‘safe’, actually scans all your mail & then selects advertising based on the content. It’s “for your own good….”
http://mail.google.com/mail/help/about_privacy.html

“Google uses the DoubleClick DART cookie on our Google content network …”
These guys are the used car salesman of the internet, very ‘slippery’ characters burying their methods, details & opt out choices with layer after layer, page after page of non-sense & merry-go-round tactics plus non-functioning links, etc.
All I can say is keep trying & get as many of these tracking portfolios killed as you can.

Yahoo! Calls their invasion of privacy “Matched advertising”, and it stems from the ‘Network Advertising Initiative’ (NAI), a conglomerate of advertising kingpins and requires “Opt Out” to defray the advertising tsunami from Yahoo’s partners in this server based spyware/adware (and to stop them from creating a ‘profile’ of you).
“Opt out” sign in pages;
Yahoo here: http://info.yahoo.com/relevantads/
Google here: http://www.google.com/privacy_ads.html
NAI garbage here: http://networkadvertising.org/managing/o…
DoubleClick here: http://www.doubleclick.com/privacy/dart_adserving.aspx

**************
Yahoo has gone insane.
**CRITICAL RECENT DEVELOPMENT**
Get this: the ‘new’ Yahoo by default, allows your Yahoo! Contacts computers, to send to whatever 3rd party software they have on THEIR computer, information about you! Can you believe that!!?
This is something you must end ASAP.
Look in your mail account settings (ya, it’s buried very conveniently) and uncheck this box!

Go to your Yahoo! Mail: near the “Welcome (your name)”, tick the ‘Profile’ link; next page, upper right corner, tick ‘Settings’; next page, near the bottom is the box to uncheck.

This is spying, pure and simple.
And the deterioration of trust with Yahoo! Grows…it’s pathetic.

IMHO: the installation of the 3rd party data siphon servers, @ Yahoo & Google, et al, have for the last 4 weeks or so, been responsible for the Internet wide “glitches” and server interruptions, and is subjecting all users to massive invasion of privacy.

**********
Note: New US Court ruling “…the U.S. Federal Communications Commission that mandate telecommunications carriers must get an “opt-in” before disclosing customers’ information to a carrier’s joint venture business partner or an independent contractor.

The FCC “gave sufficient reasons for singling out the relationships between carriers and third-party marketing partners,” the court said in denying the petition for judicial review sought by the NCTA.”
http://tech.yahoo.com/news/nm/20090213/tc_nm/us_fcc_cable_court

But even this appears to be only a ‘suggestion’ from the court & may be good news; we’ll see.

Sharon asks…

internet security???????

hey guys,
been using for Kasper’s 2010 IS for quite a while now. I am thinking of changing my IS to something that doesn’t slow down my computer as much.
so basically can you list a IS that is close or better then Kasper’s in security, but doesn’t slow down my computer as much?
thanks,
Tim

Some System specs:

4gb ram
500gb hdd
intel core 2 quad q8200 2.33ghz i think?

barry0912 answers:

Norton Internet Security 2009 (NIS 2009) is currently the FASTEST internet security package (at 7mb memory usage only!) (beats kaspersky by 15mb)

Proof http://www.pcauthority.com.au/Review/127995,norton-internet-security-2009-believe-the-hype.aspx

NIS 2009 has the lowest system usage (therefore fastest) product on the market. With high a detection rate of 92% on par with Kaspersky.

Norton Internet Security 2009 is the Fastest (more proof)

http://www.bastillwork.net/security-software/norton-internet-security-2009.html

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Norton-Internet-Security-2009-to-Come-with-Super-High-Speed-86321.shtml

http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/news/index.cfm?newsid=104478

Also answerers must understand, a free anti-virus alone can’t fully protect a system.

By the time of answering this, NIS 2010 has just been released. Faster than ever and using new reputation-based technology, this eliminates the old signature-based scanning and opens new potentials for nexgen security.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Your Questions About Internet Marketing Blog

Ken asks…

Best blog site to use for a blog?

I want to start a blog but I’m not sure what blog site to use, I want to be able to blog for free, be able to post videos on my blog, and hopefully make some money, what blog site would best fit these standards? If my blog grows, would I make more money using this site? thanks

barry0912 answers:

Website and blog Promotion Internet Marketing – Top 10 Methods

So you want to find some solid marketing methods to promote your websiteor blog?Here are the top 10 methods that I find work well for my business.

Free Methods

1. Article Marketing
This is a very productive way to get free traffic to your website, you will need to write and article that is relevant to your website this should not be a sales pitch but need to provide readable and valuable content to the user so that when they click the link at the end of your article they are ready to buy from you. The article sites also benefit form showing up very well in the search engine results pages.

Some of the biggest article directory sites that you can submit too include, ezinearticles.com.
Goarticles.com and articlebase.com.
Some of the benefits of submitting articles to these sites are as follows:
• eZine Publishers Using Your Article In Their Newsletter
• Web Masters Using Your Article On Their Websites
• On Site Search Traffic Going To Your Article
• Search Engine Traffic To Your Article

2. Web 2.0 Sites

Once you have made an article you can also syndicate it across some of the free web 2.0 sites that also rank very well in the search engines, this can be a fantastic way to get more exposure. These sites include:

• squidoo.com
• hubpages.com
• wetpaint.com
• livejournal.com
• webnode.com
• blog.com
• webs.com
• blogspot.com

3. Social Bookmarking Sites

These are a good place to get traffic from as well as getting links to your web pages, you should submit your main web page, articles and web 2.0 sites to these. Here is a list of the top 20 social
bookmarking sites:

• twitter
• digg.com
• Yahoo! Buzz
• tweetmeme.com
• StumbleUpon.com
• reddit.com
• Technorati.com
• del.icio.us
• kaboodle.com
• mixx.com
• Propeller.com
• newsvine.com
• Fark.com
• Slashdot.org
• twine.com
• clipmarks.com
• dzone.com
• faves.com
• blinklist.com
• diigo.com

4. Press Releases
These are another good way to the word out the best one is PRWeb but this is expensive but don’t worry there are some free sites that you can publish your press releases too such as PR Leap and PRBlog.

5. Classified Ad Sites
There a loads of free classified ad sites springing up everywhere off the back of the sucssess that the biggest one Craigslist has had, Craigslist gets 20 Million visitors a month. The next biggest in this space is Backpage and Gumtree is the biggest one for the UK.

6. Forum Marketing
Quite often overlooked as a traffic generation method it can be very effective essentially if you have something valuable to contribute to the discussion already going on inside the forum. You include your marketing message and your URL in your forum signature this way every time you answer a question or reply to someone its automatically included and is not

read more at source

Carol asks…

Blog publishing?

is posting to my blog considered copyrighted? If I post a new idea or work of fiction, is it protected under cpyright rules?

barry0912 answers:

From my search of the web it seems that this is going to take a lobby group to enact. Here’s a link you can check out that speaks to the murkiness of it www.docuverse.com/blog/donpark/
2003/07/14/copyrights-and-blogs. And,
Thursday, October 27, 2005–Andis Kaulins [10/27/2005 02:28:00 AM] Copyrights, Blogs, News, Content Aggregation and RSS Feeds

RSS and Atom Feeds: Really Simple Syndication

RSS feeds are revolutionizing the way that information is being processed on the Internet. Even Google just started their own Google Reader for RSS feeds this month.

What is the legal status of RSS feeds under Internet Law and IP Law (“intellectual property” law), especially in view of the fact that many blogs and news media make their content available through their RSS feeds? We include ATOM feeds here under the general rubric of RSS feeds, i.e. As “Really Simple Syndication”. Indeed, the IEEE sees Atom as the “standard in syndication”, even though the term RSS is everywhere used.

Implied Licenses Granted by Placing Material Online?

Eric Goldman at the Technology & Marketing Law Blog discusses whether making RSS feeds publicly available thereby grants an implied license of use to RSS feed users, and if so, how such an implied license could be negated, if necessary. But see Fair Use Vs. Fared Use: The Impact of Automated Rights Management on Copyright’s Fair Use Doctrine by Tom W. Bell, 76 N. Carolina L. Rev. 557 (1998).

As Goldman writes:
“[I]f a blogger makes a feed of his/her blog available, what can others [legally] do with that content?”

Take a look at his analysis and see also Scobleizer for a panoply of opinions on this topic. The non-exclusive implied license granted by placing materials online is also discussed at When One Thing Leads to Another – Linking and Metatag Liability, by Barbara S. Murphy and Lynn S. Walker, Georgia State University College of Law, Law and the Internet, Professor Wiseman, Summer 2003 (see II.1 in that article).

The Legality of Data Harvesting (not to be confused with E-Discovery Harvesting)

One issue that faces RSS feeds is the practice of “data harvesting” for purposes of creating websites which then sell ads to make money. Martin Schwimmer at the Trademark Blog refers to a ClickZ article by Pamela Parker which refers to other instances of data harvesting such as the ad aggregator Oodle.com or the job aggregator Indeed.com.

There are data harvesting cases which have been decided and which clearly support the principle that data harvesting is legal under some circumstances. See the article Golf Scores v. Yacht Sales: Copyright Law and Data Extraction by Javad Heydary and By No Other (related USA Today, Nautical Solutions Marketing v. Boats.com). At the same time, there are also cases which clearly have found other kinds of data harvesting to be illegal, albeit not necessarily on copyright infringement grounds, e.g. Register.com, Inc. V. Verio, Inc., 126 F. Supp. 2d 238 (S.D.N.Y. 2000), aff’ d, 356 F.3d 393 (2d Cir. 2004). See Phillips Nizer for an abstract of that case and the Boston University School of Law, Journal of Science and Technology Law, Legal Update by James J. Tracy for a contract view of browsewrap agreements.

Terms of Use for RSS Feeds

The terms of use for RSS feeds published by mainstream publishers such as the New York Times clearly claim a full copyright to content syndicated by RSS feeds. These terms of use strictly exclude commercial use such as commercial data harvesting.

The New York Times offers over 30 free RSS feeds, albeit under the following terms and conditions:

“We encourage the use of NYTimes.com RSS feeds for personal use in a news reader or as part of a non-commercial Web site or blog. We require proper format and attribution whenever New York Times content is posted on your Web site, and we reserve the right to require that you cease distributing NYTimes.com content. Please read the Terms and Conditions for complete instructions.

NYTimes.com also offers a free headline feed for displaying headlines on personal or professional Web sites, for non-commercial purposes. For more information and instructions, see Add New York Times Headlines to Your Site.”

Use of Headlines Written by Other Sources

With regard to the use of headlines, the Japanese Intellectual Property High Court recently decided that it was copyright infringement for a commercial online enterprise – without asking for permission – to use newspaper headlines on its website from Japan’s largest daily newspaper. We do not doubt that courts in other countries would make similar holdings.

Fair Use of RSS Feeds and Attribution

The free use which the New York Times offers is essentially an expanded “fair use”, i.e. Use of news on a “non-commercial Web site or blog”. This is essentially similar to the “Creative Commons” license found at the bottom of the LawPundit blog pages, where use of LawPundit material – with proper attribution – is permitted for non-commercial purposes. The NY Times also requires proper attribution of their materials, although attribution has an unclear status in copyright law as far as “fair use” of copyrighted materials is concerned.

As written by Mark A. Lemley, Rights of Attribution and Integrity in Online Communications, 1995 J. ONLINE L. , art. 2, par. 20:

“Both of these cases [Waldman Publishing Corp. V. Landoll Inc. And Robinson v. Random House Inc)] suggest that a right of attribution does in fact exist in United States law, at least in circumstances where the failure to attribute has a commercial effect. If you copy material without identifying it as copied, that fact may hurt you in a copyright infringement suit. Even if you cannot be sued for copyright infringement, your failure to attribute copied material may be actionable under the Lanham Act if it confuses consumers as to the source of the copied material. Taken together, these cases suggest that the worst cases of nonattribution will be taken care of by the existing law.”

Attribution not required for Works in the Public Domain

The rule is different for works in the public domain, where attribution is not required. This was decided in Dastar Corp. V. Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp., 539 U.S. 23 (2003). See Stacey L. Garrett, No need to Search the Nile: The Supreme Court Clarifies the Use of Public Domain Works in Dastar v. Twentieth Century Fox, Journal of Law, Technology & Policy (Univ. Of Illinois), Fall, 2003.

Where is the Line between Commercial and Non-Commercial Use?

The line between a non-commercial or commercial website or blog is not clear. In Harper & Row v. Nation Enterprises, 471 U.S. 539 (1985) , the US Supreme Court found:

“The fact that a publication was commercial as opposed to nonprofit is a separate factor that tends to weigh against a finding of fair use. “[E]very commercial use of copyrighted material is presumptively an unfair exploitation of the monopoly privilege that belongs to the owner of the copyright.” Sony Corp. Of America v. Universal City Studios, Inc., 464 U.S., at 451 . In arguing that the purpose of news reporting is not purely commercial, The Nation misses the point entirely. The crux of the profit/nonprofit distinction is not whether the sole motive of the use is monetary gain but whether the user stands to profit from exploitation of the copyrighted material without paying the customary price. See Roy Export Co. Establishment v. Columbia Broadcasting System, Inc., 503 F. Supp., at 1144; 3 Nimmer 13.05[A]1., at 13-71, n. 25.3.”

Many websites and blogs place advertising on their online pages to help pay for costs, e.g. Of webspace, etc. And are not really “commercial” undertakings as such, nor are they generally viewed to be “commercial” in nature. Where will the courts draw the line?

What happens, for example, when an otherwise “non-commercial” website or blog is so successful that its commercial ads begin to reap actual profits for the website or for the blogger? Once that happens, such websites or blogs surely become “commercial” in nature, which makes it much more difficult, but not impossible, to invoke the “fair use” exception to the copyright laws.

But even if no profit is being made, could a site harvesting RSS feeds use RSS feed material to promulgate e.g. Pornographic advertising on a website in the hope of gain? The answer here must surely be “no”, and evidence of purpose, rather than profit, ought to be sufficient.

Clear Terms of Use are Important

In any case, put into different words, RSS feeds “belong” as such to the originator of the RSS feed. Fair use can be made of these feeds, but not commercial use. The solution for the “grey cases” may be in part that RSS feed originators clearly declare the permissible uses of their materials on the website pages. The New York Times terms of use listed here provide a good model to start. Of course, no copyright holder can prohibit lawful fair use, even if such fair use were to be expressly denied by the copyright owner. There will be friction in this grey area.

What about RSS Feed Catalogues?

The most interesting legal question in this connection is whether the use of RSS feeds for legitimate “cataloging purposes” by a commercial enterprise, such as Technorati or Google BlogSearch, is fair use. We think it is in principle, because we find it to be a permissible “transformative use” as in the Arriba case. However, we do not know what the courts will decide in this regard.

Technorati Tags:

IP, intellectual property, law, James J. Tracy, RSS feeds, LawPundit, copyrights, Javad Heydary, NY Times, ATOM feeds, Mark A. Lemley, copyright law, Google Reader, legal, IP law, syndication, implied license, linking, metatags, data harvesting, copyright infringement, browsewrap agreements, attribution, public domain, data extraction, feed catalogs, fair use, Kaulins, Arriba, Tom W. Bell, Technorati, North Carolina Law Review, Stacey L. Garrett, blog search.

Www.lawpundit.com/
blog/2005/10/
copyrights-blogs-news-
content.htm

Permalink : Andis Kaulins : 10/27/2005 02:28:00 AM

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Your Questions About Internet Marketing News

Ruth asks…

Compare newspapers and the internet as sources of news?

barry0912 answers:

Internet is good for sports scores and breaking stories.

Newspapers are good for in-depth stories and editorials.

There’s space in the market for both.

William asks…

Norton Internet Security 2009 Renewal ?

Hi Guys
I have bought a HP Laptop and i got Norton Internet Security 2009 60 days trial version

Now it will expire in next week,
Please let me know whether I should buy the license for it
OR do I need to go with any other anti virus / internet security

Which antivirus / internet security is better for Intel Core2Duo / 2GB RAM / Vista OS SYSTEM?

Thanks in advance
Thanks for you guys for all responses

So understood from all you guys that I should go will Norton Internet Security 2009 for my laptop
As Ed has provided the URL to buy the product, whether this is right site to buy or there may chance that they may give me any pirated software is US$20 (I am in India).

In India, I am getting KASPERSKY Internet Security Anti Virus Software 2009 Version (3 Users Pack, 1 Year License) in Rs. 594/-
While I am getting Norton Internet Security -2009 (1 User – 1 year) in Rs. 2000/-

barry0912 answers:

Norton Internet Security is perfect for you, and yes bunty is wrong.
Kaspersky is a good product, but please don’t provide false information.

Get Norton Internet Security 2009

Norton Internet Security 2009 (NIS 2009) is currently the FASTEST internet security package (at 7mb memory usage only!) (beats kaspersky by 15mb)

http://www.pcauthority.com.au/Review/127995,norton-internet-security-2009-believe-the-hype.aspx

NIS 2009 has the lowest system usage (therefore fastest) product on the market. With high a detection rate of 92% on par with Kaspersky.

Norton Internet Security 2009 is the Fastest ( more proof )

http://www.bastillwork.net/security-software/norton-internet-security-2009.html

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Norton-Internet-Security-2009-to-Come-with-Super-High-Speed-86321.shtml

http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/news/index.cfm?newsid=104478

Also answerers must understand, a free anti-virus alone can’t fully protect a system.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Your Questions About Internet Marketing

William asks…

Why is Internet marketing so hard?

I have read so much stuff, OHHHHHHH it’s so EASY all you got to do is make a website, get advertising, content, products…get on ADSENSE…google…adwords…like that scene from the three stooges when they were drilling in the army…HARCH…to the rear HARCH…left shoulder HARCH…to the rear…HARCH …HARCH…harsh!!! MANNNNnnnnnn I have had it. I am pretty stubborn but I also know when I am licked.

barry0912 answers:

Internet marketing is simple, but not easy. My best advice is to look at what everyone else is doing. Really analyse what others do.

E.g. See an ad on a website you are visiting? There is a good chance that they are making money through displaying that ad. No need to reinvent the wheel, just reverse engineer and mix it up with your own twists….

Look up a product review article? Someone wrote that and are probably getting affiliate commissions for it. See a review on YouTube? Its all simple stuff, you just have to go ahead and do it. Learn as you go.

Be a pro at what you do, not a jack of all trades master of none. Don’t over complicate it, keep it simple and go. Humans have a tendency to make everything a lot more complicated than it needs to be, otherwise it is ‘too easy’. Mindset is a huge factor.

Good luck mate.

Donna asks…

please give me more information about internet marketing…?

barry0912 answers:

Internet Marketing covers a very broad spectrum.
Start with Search Engine marketing, there are several ways to go about this, from simple submission to professional optimization, to PPC campaigns.
Then there are email campaigns, need to be careful with these. Hiring a professional for this is a good idea.
Then you have link and banner trade programs. Some of which are very effective.
The list goes on.
These guys may be able to help you get started. They have a lot of experience, and the prices are fair.
Www.AncientCityDigital.com

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Your Questions About Internet Marketing Services

Michael asks…

isp(internet service provider)?

can u tell me some isp providers? can you tell me the company name? does it need to interfere with the telephone line to acess the internet? how do u pay for it? and what about the tellephone number?can u tell me it pleez? what is the web adress? do i need to buy something extra(ie router)? what modem does it need what are the speeds this isp(kbps etc.)? and finally, how do i get that isp or wat do i need to download? sorry for the trouble the question with the most stuff will be picked the best answer thanks(^_^) ; }

barry0912 answers:

Cable broadband Internet service.
In large subscriber surveys, Cox receives the highest scores for performance, customer service and reliability among cable broadband ISPs. A cable modem is included for free if you install it yourself. Download speeds top out at 4.0Mbps compared to dial-up (50Kbps) and DSL (generally 1.5Mbps or 3.0Mbps). Subscribers to other Cox services can get a discount of $10 to $15 per month. Cox isn’t available in all markets; in that case, Earthlink cable also gets high scores.
• Earthlink cable
(*est. $42 per month)

>> Where to buy
Cable broadband ISP.
Earthlink ties with Cox as the best cable ISP, and is the best choice if Cox isn’t available in your area. Earthlink also gets high scores for overall customer satisfaction and reliability, though its technical support ratings have slipped in the last year. Earthlink includes a highly regarded spam filter, along with other security features. Speed is rated at 5.0Mbps, and a modem is free with self-installation. If neither Cox nor Earthlink is available in your area, Road Runner and Optimum Online cable services are close runners-up.
• SBC Yahoo DSL Pro
(*est. $22 for the first six months, $35 thereafter)

>> Where to buy
DSL Internet service.
Reviews say cable Internet service is faster than DSL, but DSL is usually less expensive. DSL is also available in several speed classes, so you can choose to sacrifice some speed for a lower monthly bill. Among DSL service providers, SBC Yahoo and Verizon get the highest ratings for reliability and overall customer satisfaction. Yahoo’s standard DSL gets up to 3.0Mbps downstream — comparable to most cable ISPs — yet Yahoo DSL costs less. Availability depends upon your local phone-service provider, since DSL works through existing phone lines. (SBC will soon change its name to AT&T as it completes a merger with that company.)
• Verizon basic DSL
(*est. $15 per month, 768Kbps download speed)

>> Where to buy
Budget DSL.
While most cable and DSL services reach download speeds of 3.0Mbps, Verizon’s new budget DSL has a maximum downstream speed of just 768Kbps. While much slower than other broadband, basic Verizon DSL service is still 15 times faster than a dial-up connection. And because it is DSL, your connection to the Internet is always on and it doesn’t tie up your phone line. While reviews say Verizon’s basic DSL service is nowhere near as fast as other broadband, its low cost makes it a compelling alternative to a slower dial-up ISP like AOL or Earthlink dial-up, both of which are more expensive.
• Earthlink dial-up
(*est. $22 per month)

>> Where to buy
Dial-up.
Earthlink tops nearly every review we found for dial-up Internet service, and it’s available just about everywhere. Reviews say Earthlink dial-up is easy to set up, has thousands of access numbers, and has a low call and Web-page failure rate. Its cost is average for an unlimited dial-up ISP, but if Verizon’s basic DSL is available in your area, Verizon is faster and less expensive.
• NetZero or Juno dial-up
(Up to 10 hours of free usage per month)

>> Where to buy
Free Dial-up.
If your needs amount to occasionally checking your e-mail or a little Web surfing, NetZero and Juno (which are owned by the same parent company) offer a free dial-up Internet connection for up to ten hours each month. In exchange for a free ISP, you’ll have to contend with permanent advertising on your computer screen. Once your ten hours are up, you’ll be charged about $10 a month for ad-free access.

Steven asks…

Tips on internet marketing?

barry0912 answers:

Internet Marketing Tips :
1. Send a Press Release
2. Submit Product Feeds
3. Share Your Knowledge
4. Grab Local Listings
5. Offer an Affilate Program
6. Don’t use site-wide links.
7. Don’t be a Copycat.
8. Use the title and meta description tags as wise as possible.
9. Build an affiliate system for the services products you are offering.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers